Da Boss Bessa

I’m in love with my friend and I don’t how to her

kronosfhtagn:

TomorrowWorld 2013 - Eat, Sleep, Rave, Repeat

wisedishwasher:

Welcome to #TomorrowWorld yes this is accurate. seas and seas and droves of people dancing to EDM is delightful. Everyone is happy at all times. Its beautiful

wisedishwasher:

Welcome to #TomorrowWorld yes this is accurate. seas and seas and droves of people dancing to EDM is delightful. Everyone is happy at all times. Its beautiful

Part of Hardwell’s set @ Tomorrowworld  

tomorrow world changed my life
gracefulness:

i love her so much

gracefulness:

i love her so much

womenatwarbjj:

Do you?

womenatwarbjj:

Do you?

pedeprasai:

hahhaa Achei foda.

pedeprasai:

hahhaa Achei foda.

tmccarverjr:

Why would you even want to pass her guard?

tmccarverjr:

Why would you even want to pass her guard?

frickyeah1990s:

Can I get a  HELLYEAH

frickyeah1990s:

Can I get a  HELLYEAH

la-mia-nevrosi:

 4 Eras in 4 minutes

la-mia-nevrosi:

4 Eras in 4 minutes

best fucking day

i got no sleep, woke up with a busted finger, go to school just to find out my scholar ship got denied, serve community serves, get home puppy tore up the house. go to work and redo the same work i did before. going to take a shower when heat got cut. and the day is still young

vicemag:

I Saw the Future of Pot at Seattle’s Hempfest
It’s been a good year for pot lovers. The new recreational weed laws Washington and Colorado passed last November have taken effect. Illinois just became the 20th state to legalize medical marijuana. An industry eager to help users find and ingest their favorite strain grows larger and more legitimate by the day. And the federal government—which still outlaws producing, selling, and using pot—has yet to pull the plug.
So naturally, the vibe at the 22nd annual Hempfest—the massive pot pageant held in Seattle, Washington, this past weekend—was 100 percent celebratory. Sure, there were the usual activists calling for an end to federal prohibition. But the real business of the three-day weed-stravaganza was to make a leisurely victory lap to mark the state’s recent legalization of recreational ganja.
The scene at this so-called protestival, was fairly predictable, especially if you’ve spent time at freakier potcentric scenes like Phish or Grateful Dead concerts (events I’ve been to more times than I’d like to admit). Teens and seniors alike crowded Seattle’s downtown waterfront park to shop, dance, take in the sun, make a statement, people watch, and light up.
To answer your question, yes, there were bongs available for purchase.
Half a dozen stages featured an endless loop of reggae and cosmogroove (yes, that is a real genre). Speakers gushed excitedly about the beginning of the end of prohibition and the remaining work to be done. Vapes, pipes, bongs, grinders, memorabilia, and munchies spilled from hundreds of vendor booths. Pot leaves embellished stages, products, business cards, T-shirts, and port-a-potties. Even Ken Kesey’s legendary Further bus made an appearance. Everywhere I looked, someone was firing up a joint, pipe, or bong.
Continue

vicemag:

I Saw the Future of Pot at Seattle’s Hempfest

It’s been a good year for pot lovers. The new recreational weed laws Washington and Colorado passed last November have taken effect. Illinois just became the 20th state to legalize medical marijuana. An industry eager to help users find and ingest their favorite strain grows larger and more legitimate by the day. And the federal government—which still outlaws producing, selling, and using pot—has yet to pull the plug.

So naturally, the vibe at the 22nd annual Hempfest—the massive pot pageant held in Seattle, Washington, this past weekend—was 100 percent celebratory. Sure, there were the usual activists calling for an end to federal prohibitionBut the real business of the three-day weed-stravaganza was to make a leisurely victory lap to mark the state’s recent legalization of recreational ganja.

The scene at this so-called protestival, was fairly predictable, especially if you’ve spent time at freakier potcentric scenes like Phish or Grateful Dead concerts (events I’ve been to more times than I’d like to admit). Teens and seniors alike crowded Seattle’s downtown waterfront park to shop, dance, take in the sun, make a statement, people watch, and light up.


To answer your question, yes, there were bongs available for purchase.

Half a dozen stages featured an endless loop of reggae and cosmogroove (yes, that is a real genre). Speakers gushed excitedly about the beginning of the end of prohibition and the remaining work to be done. Vapes, pipes, bongs, grinders, memorabilia, and munchies spilled from hundreds of vendor booths. Pot leaves embellished stages, products, business cards, T-shirts, and port-a-potties. Even Ken Kesey’s legendary Further bus made an appearance. Everywhere I looked, someone was firing up a joint, pipe, or bong.

Continue